Earn 1,000 United Miles For Spending $1


You can earn 1,000 United miles by signing up for an almost free ($1) two-month subscription to the Wall Street Journal online by 11:59 PM ET March 9, 2018.

I value United miles at 1.6 cents each. I don’t particularly want a paid subscription to the Wall Street Journal, so paying $1 for a two month trial and getting 1,000 United miles to do so is basically like paying $1 to get $16. I’d do that any day, wouldn’t you?

Don’t Forget to Cancel

Just remember to cancel a little before two months after you sign up if you don’t want to continue with a paid subscription. Don’t cancel any sooner than 46 days after you sign up or your miles could be clawed back. The following is from the promo terms…

“The trial subscription purchase must remain active (i.e., may not be cancelled) for at least 45 days.”

You have to put in credit card info to purchase the $1 subscription, and if you don’t cancel two months in, the Wall Street Journal will charge $36.00 + tax to that same card and renew your subscription for a month.

What to Do

The whole process takes minutes. Sign into your United MileagePlus account. Then create an account with the Wall Street Journal by navigating here and pressing Subscribe now), choose the All Access Digital pack…

the input your billing address, and finally input your credit card info. I just signed up myself and set an alert in my Google Calendar (I love Google Calendar for this purpose–I set an alert and it emails me the day I need to deal with something) and will likely cancel a little less than two months now to avoid any further charges.

Note that you have to call the WSJ to cancel. The following is from their terms regarding cancellation and refund policy:

“In order to change or cancel your subscription please contact Customer Service at 1-(800)-Journal (568-7625) for outside the U.S. WSJ 1-609-514-0870 and Barron’s 1-609-520-4800. We do not accept cancellations by mail or email or by any other means other than calling Customer Service.”

Editorial Disclaimer: The editorial content is not provided or commissioned by the credit card issuers. Opinions expressed here are author’s alone, not those of the credit card issuers, and have not been reviewed, approved or otherwise endorsed by the credit card issuers.

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    • It’s a bit of a hassle. I’m just so used to calling airlines and being put on hold (I just get other work done in the meantime) that I don’t really consider it a hassle.


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